how to keep bread fresh longer

How to Keep Sourdough Bread Fresh (DIY Bread Bag)

We are making so much homemade sourdough bread these days, and have been struggling with how to keep our bread fresh longer without adding a bread box to the kitchen clutter.

I’m tired of using paper bags in the microwave, which ends up making a mess anyway. And plastic bags, well, no thanks.

I saw a bunch of sites selling linen bread bags — so pretty, so french. But they get terrible reviews! Apparently the linen itself isn’t enough to hold the moisture in. So I decided to try waxing the linen with beeswax, like all those wraps you see everywhere now. And presto. Perfection.

This bag fits a boule shaped loaf that is roughly nine inches in diameter. Of course, you can make the bag any shape you want to fit the kinds of loaves you eat. The dimensions for the ribbon channel would stay the same.

Supplies for Making the Bag

Supplies for Waxing the Bag

Time needed: 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Instructions for a Sewing a Waxed Bread Bag

  1. Cut your fabric

    Make sure you have pre-washed your fabric to remove all the chemicals. (You also need to iron it.) Using your cutting mat, ruler, and rotary cutter, cut a piece 14 inches by 28 inches.

  2. Pin and mark your fabric

    Fold the fabric in half lengthwise, right sides together, and pin the side edges. You should now have a 14-inch by 14-inch square.

    With the folded edge closest to you, measure 3 inches from the top edge, and make a mark 5/8 inch in from each of the side edges. Do this on both sides.

  3. Sew the edges

    Sew a 5/8 inch seam on each side from the bottom folded edge up to the mark you just made. Backstitch at the beginning and end of each seam.

  4. Clip and press seam allowance

    Clip the seam allowance on each side at the 3-inch mark you made. Fold in the top 3 inches of all four pieces of fabric along the seam line. Press them flat.

  5. Create the ribbon channel (step 1)

    Fold down the top edge of the bag 1/4 inch and press.

    Fold and Press the Top Quarter Inch of Fabric

  6. Create the ribbon channel (step 2)

    Then fold down this folded edge to align with the three-inch marks you made. Press in place and pin.Fold fabric down to marks

  7. Sew the ribbon channel seams (step 3)

    Sew a 1/8-inch seam along the edge on each side of your bag to create the channel for your ribbon or cord, backstitching at the beginning and end. Make sure you have pulled the other layer clear so you don’t stitch the two sides together!

  8. Trim the seam allowance

    Trim the seam allowance on each side with the pinking shears, and turn the bag right side out. (I trimmed mine before I pressed and sewed the ribbon channel.)

  9. Prep for waxing your bag

    Preheat your oven to 225º. Cut a piece of parchment paper to cover your baking sheet and lay your bag out on the paper.

  10. Melt the wax

    Bring a cup or so of water to a simmer in a saucepan. You want the water about an inch to an inch and a half deep. Put 3 tablespoons of beeswax pellets and 1 tablespoon of jojoba oil in a heatproof glass bowl. Make sure you use a bowl that is tall enough that the water won’t come over the edge, or pour out some of the water.

    Turn off the heat under the water and carefully set the glass bowl into the water, and wait for the wax to melt. It’ll take about 5 to 10 minutes. You might need to turn the heat back on for a few minutes. Keep it very low.

    Another Technique Not to Try
    The first time I tried waxing the fabric, I sprinkled the beeswax and the jojoba oil on the fabric and then put the whole thing in the oven to let it melt. Then I spread it around with the brush and popped it back in the oven for a few minutes.

    A lot of people use this technique for making beeswax wraps. As the fabric cooled though it got this mottled pattern to it, and in the parts that were darker the fabric wasn’t as stiff. I think it was because the wax and the oil didn’t blend together very well. So don’t make my mistake and skip this step!Melt beeswax and jojoba oil in hot water

  11. Brush the wax and oil mixture onto your bag

    Use the brush to stir the melted wax and oil a little. Then start brushing the wax mixture onto your bag. The wax will cool and harden as you brush it on — that’s ok. And you don’t need to cover every last inch of the bag. It’ll spread out. But do put some on both sides.

  12. Put the bag in the oven

    Pop the bag on the half sheet into the oven for 5 to 10 minutes so that the wax remelts.

  13. Spread the wax around again

    Use the paintbrush to spread the wax around more and even it out. Make sure you get it on the seams so those are sealed as well. I also used a scraper (anything will do, a piece of stiff cardboard or plastic) to remove any excess.

  14. Let your bag cool

    Stick a couple of wooden spoons or dowels inside your bag to open it up while it cools. I held the wooden spoons up in the air with the bag on top of them and gently waved it back and forth to get it to cool faster.

  15. Thread and tie your ribbon

    Use a yarn needle or a large safety pin to thread your ribbon or tape through the ribbon channel on both sides. Then even up the ends and tie an overhand knot with the ends.

Sourdough bread in waxed bread bag

I’m going to be honest with you, when I made the first waxed bread bag I wasn’t sure if it would actually keep the bread fresh. I really thought that it would work, but we all know how that goes sometimes…

Actually, the waxed bag ended up working better than I thought it would! After three days, with just a little nub of the bread left, it was still very soft on the inside and nice and crispy on the outside.

If you are interested in baking your own homemade sourdough bread, check out this step-by-step tutorial for beginners.

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